Community

Our youth substance use prevention strategies seek to identify and reduce the conditions in a community that increase the risk of youth substance use and we help identify and promote those conditions that reduce the risk of use.


How healthy is your community environment?

  • As your child walks or rides to school, what kinds of businesses do they pass?
  • Are there stores that sell products that are designed to promote health and well-being? Or do they pass the neighborhood liquor store or marijuana retailer on their way to school?
  • Are there sidewalks on the route to school, or afterschool youth center, or park?
  • How does your child participate in after school programs? Are there buses or car pools for after school programming or sports practices?

Community conditions affect all of us. We focus on prevention strategies to change the conditions in communities that increase the risk of youth substance use.


OUR APPROACH

We approach these issues as public health problems and identify things in the larger community environment that increase the risk of youth substance use instead of focusing efforts on individuals. If we are to succeed in this effort, we have to focus on confronting conditions that increase youth substance use.


We look beyond the individual to the group, community, and culture for factors that affect youth substance use. Community beliefs and attitudes may result in individual or group behavior that can either increase or reduce the risk of youth substance use. These beliefs are reflected in conditions that affect the use of substances. For example, stores in a community that are selling alcohol to minors or older youth introducing those younger to substances are some of the conditions we strive to address to prevent and reduce youth substance use.


ANONYMOUS TIP LINE

Hear about an underage drinking party? Know about illegal drug use? Not sure what to do? Text a Tip!


The law enforcement agencies serving the towns in Lincoln County are proud to work hand-in-hand with the community to address underage drinking or illegal drug use. This program allows community members to send anonymous tips about underage drinking or illegal drug use to their local law enforcement agency. Anyone can submit a tip via text message, or online.


CLICK TO SUBMIT AN ANONYMOUS TIP ONLINE


SUBMIT A TIP VIA TEXT MESSAGE

Using your cell phone, text the keyword “LTIP” and your tip to 274637


Want more detail on how the Tip Line works? Click here.


IF YOU NEED IMMEDIATE ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CALL 911.


Note: Tips are anonymous – the law enforcement agency has no way of identifying you.


DRUG TAKE BACK EVENTS

Drug Take-Back Events address a vital public safety and public health issue. Each day, approximately 2,500 teens use prescription drugs to get high for the first time according to the Partnership for a Drug Free America. Studies show that a majority of used prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet.


In an effort to address this problem, local law enforcement agencies in conjunction with the DEA conduct National Prescription Drug Take-Back Days twice a year. Drug Take-Back occurs twice a year in the spring and the fall.


The purpose of these Drug Take-Back Days is to provide an avenue for persons to safely dispose of unwanted and unused prescription drugs.


These efforts are a huge success in removing potentially dangerous prescription drugs, particularly controlled substances, from our communities' medicine cabinets.


PRESENTATIONS & TRAININGS

Healthy Lincoln County provides guidance and training to individuals, organizations, businesses and others within our service area.


Contact us for more information or to request a presentation. Visit our News + Events page and Facebook for new tips and events.


SIRP PROGRAM FOR TEENS

Student Intervention and Reintegration Program (SIRP) is a 12-hour educational based program for youth experimenting with alcohol or other drugs. The program empowers youth to make healthy decisions and reduce risk. It provides evidence-based information to youth about the risks of use, and helps them weigh—for themselves—the advantages and disadvantages of continuing to use. Most important, it helps participants plan for and commit to changes in their behavior. The program is a conversation, not a lecture and is offered in small groups (4-12 people). Each class is taught by a nationally certified PRIME for Life instructor and a community champion conducts an informational meeting with parents and follows up with families to encourage success.


To enroll a student in the program, there is a referral form to complete. Parents, schools, and law enforcement can all refer a teen to this program.


SIRP Referral Form 2017

TIPS and RESOURCES

We have compiled several resources below or contact us for more information or to request a specific data. Follow us on Facebook for updated information.